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founding

If you get canceled, so will I. All lives matter.

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The answer to Brooks’s question is: “No.” We should not be “marching to get Black and brown children back safely into schools right now.” We should be advocating (sorry, I’m not personally into marching) for children to get back into school. Children of any race.

Now, if I were going to give Brooks the benefit of the doubt, I would say he is emphasizing the race and ethnicity of many of the students harmed by the policies of progressive mayors and teachers’ unions in order to tweak the left, which claims to stand for the downtrodden but which often enacts policies that hurt those same downtrodden.

You could be right about why he focused on non-white children. But there are other legitimate reasons; such as the belief that the problem impacts non-white children especially hard. We worry a lot about forest fires in CA because CA has a lot of them and the damage is more severe. That doesn't mean a forest fire in Kentucky isn't bad. It just means that the bigger problem isn't in KY.

https://www.nccp.org/demographic/ shows that over half of non-white children live in poverty. That might be a reason to focus on that demographic.

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founding

Good points, Time123, and I largely agree. But note this from your link:

Child’s Race/Ethnicity

27% (9,683,562) of white children live in low-income families.

59% (5,625,533) of black children live in low-income families.

56% (10,135,422) of Hispanic children live in low-income families.

27% (946,249) of Asian children live in low-income families.

59% (309,739) of American Indian children live in low-income families.

Focusing on the 15M black and brown children ignores 11M other children. They don't need or deserve that simply because of the color of their skin.

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It could, but it doesn't have to. That would depend on the specifics of the solution being used.

-Let's give money only the poor parents of brown children would do what you fear.

-Let's provide additional resources to schools that serve very poor communities, or inner city communities, would not.

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founding

Further, why reward failing schools with more money? Why not try vouchers and let parents decide?

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founding

How would that work? Wouldn't that likely mean most money goes to urban schools with many poor students, but leave out rural and suburban schools? In almost every case, wouldn't that still make race the deciding factor?

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I think 10 dollars a month would be more appropriate

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